The Wind Was a Torrent of Darkness

That got your attention, didn’t it? I like poetry. That dazzle-me line opens Alfred Noyes’s poem The Highwayman. And a poet’s gotta dazzle. Fiction writers, too. Especially in that blasted-hard first line. Yes, the last chapter of your book sells your next book. The first chapter though…*shudders*

I’m not going to write about how to write a killer opening sentence, especially since my blog isn’t 100% geared toward writers. I’m also not going to blog a bunch of awesome opening lines. Nope. That’s been done a million times. What I AM going to do is play a little game. I am going to POMP-UP or POMP-DOWN some famous first lines and see if anyone knows what the heck I’m talking about.

Ready? No? Too bad. (*Changed for spoilers)

Mystery lines:

  1. That time past was full of paradoxes.
  2. ‘“Yuletide shan’t be Yuletide with the absence of gifting,” bemoaned X.*
  3. Any man with good money needs a woman.
  4. The chance of taking a stroll during a particular day was non-existent.
  5. Two big to-do Italian families hate each other, but their kids have a thing for each other. Woe!

Are you able to guess any of those? Leave your thoughts in the comments, if you would be so good to do so, my friend. There’s a good fellow…or fella! …er, nvrmnd.

Keep your pen on the page,
Beth

P.S. This post’s image is a hint for #4

P.P.S. It’s also meant to freak you out just a little.

P.P.P.S. Not a hint for #4 after all. So, yeah, just meant to freak you out.

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Author: bethovermyer

Beth Overmyer wears several hats, all belonging to different writers. From fantastical kidlit to everyday popular fiction, Beth pens her work with gusto. In 2008, her screenplay The Method won best comedy at Gotham Screen’s contest, and in 2012, her MG book In a Pickle came out from MuseItUp Publishing.

5 thoughts on “The Wind Was a Torrent of Darkness”

  1. 1. A tale of two cities by Charles Dickens
    2. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
    3. Pride and Predjudice by Jane Auston
    4. No idea… =P
    5. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

    How’d I do?

    Liked by 1 person

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